THE SEXEDUCATOR MAGAZINE

25Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
Issue 25 | Spring 2016
by Marie-Andrée Bossé
Most adolescents have worries when it comes to contraception. Those concerns can vary depending on their age, sex, sexual activity, type of relationship with a sex partner, culture, information they have been given, and anticipation about their parents’ reaction and support. That adolescents have some knowledge about contraception and access to it (e.g. access to a nurse or doctor, affordable cost, quick access) is not enough for them to use a contraceptive method properly. Some personal, relational, familial and social factors should also be considered to better support adolescents’ choices, and their adoption and ongoing use of contraception.
This issue of The SexEducator helps grasp and describe factors that influence adolescents’ use of contraceptive methods. It looks at potential interventions that can be useful for care providers in the health and social services network who give teens advice on contraception. It also suggests learning activities that can be conducted in schools by school team members (e.g. teachers and other professionals), in collaboration with health and social services network professionals (e.g. school nurses ) and in other settings (e.g. youth community centres).
See the activities suggested in this issue
1Activity 1
Communication about contraception

Role play that engage participants in resolving a situation in which they will illustrate strategies for communication about contraception and some associated difficulties.

Educational goal:
  • Encourage teens to define their feelings and perceptions concerning discussions with their parents about sexuality.

Related learning content:
  • Understand attitudes and behaviours to adopt in situations in which it may be difficult to protect yourself

Audience:
For secondary 3 students (14-15-year-olds)

Duration: 75 minutes
2Activity 2
Contraception: girl's perspectives, boys’ perspectives

Group discussion using the fishbowl technique that allows exploration of shared responsibility related to contraception.

Educational goal:
  • Recognize the realities and myths concerning behaviours ant attitudes expected of boys in relation to seduction, romantic relationships and sexuality, and the consequences of these expectations.

Related learning content:
  • Identify strategies favouring safe sexual behaviours based on factors that influence your own ability to protect yourself.
Audience:
For secondary 4 students (15-16-years-old)

Duration: 75 minutes
3Activity 3
When contraception overshadows the condom 

Profound reflexion on the risk level for sexually transmitted infections of multiple situations in relation to each other.

Educational goal:
  • Explain the importance of using dual protection from the perspective of evaluating risks for sexually transmitted infections in various situations.

Related learning content:
  • Evaluate the risks of STBBIs and pregnancy associated with different contexts of a sexually active lifestyle

Audience:
For secondary V students (16-17-year-olds)

Duration: 75 minutes
Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
Issue 25 - Spring 2016 - by Marie-Andrée Bossé
Sommaire du numéro EN
Most adolescents have worries when it comes to contraception. Those concerns can vary depending on their age, sex, sexual activity, type of relationship with a sex partner, culture, information they have been given, and anticipation about their parents’ reaction and support. That adolescents have some knowledge about contraception and access to it (e.g. access to a nurse or doctor, affordable cost, quick access) is not enough for them to use a contraceptive method properly. Some personal, relational, familial and social factors should also be considered to better support adolescents’ choices, and their adoption and ongoing use of contraception.
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Other issues
  • Communication in adolescent couples
  • Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
  • Counteracting the trivialization of sexual exploitation
  • Talking sexuality with your parents
  • Our Romeos: All they think about is sex, right ?
  • The bi trend: Open mindedness or trivialization?
  • FLIRTING ON LINE: Toward a safe and fulfilling exploration of self and others
  • Youth and sexism, from inequality to indifference
  • Flirting with seduction
  • Sexual fantaisies during adolescence...
Issue 25 | Spring 2016
Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
by Marie-Andrée Bossé
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