THE SEXEDUCATOR MAGAZINE

22Our Romeos: All they think about is sex, right ?
Issue 22 | Winter 2013
by Annabelle Marsan
These days, society conveys many contradictory messages about men and masculinity. Boys have to define themselves according to a flood of role models that value opposite aspects of masculinity. On the one hand, we encourage boys to be cool, confident and strong; on the other hand, we want them to be able to show that they can be vulnerable, sensitive and open. Should boys become virile heroes or prince charmings? The answer isn’t so simple. 

Boys admit to being confused by the contradictory male role models they see. What criteria do they need to meet and how must they act if they want to be considered ‘real men’? A double standard pressures them into thinking they must have all the traditional male characteristics—courageous, virile and protective— as well as those of the new man who is more in touch with his emotions. Boys are under the impression that they must attain a balance between macho and nice guy. Not too macho, not too tender... and not easy to find a middle ground when you’re an adolescent on a quest for an identity! How do we justify linking the themes of masculinity and sexuality? Development of a masculine identity is at the core of difficulties that boys must deal with; the concept they have of masculinity likely influences their sexuality and romantic relationships.

See the activities suggested in this issue
1Activity 1
Make a man of yourself

Team reflection on society’s real man models

Pedagogical goals:
  • Know the principle criteria of masculinity and the characteristics of a real man, and note the differences between boys’ and girls’ points of view on these issues.
  • Recognize the unrealistic side of wanting to conform to all norms of masculinity.

Audience: 
For secondary V students

Duration: 
60 minutes
2Activity 2
Real man versus authentic man

Team reflection on myths and realities associated to behaviours and attitudes of boys related to seduction, romantic relationships, and sexuality.

Pedagogical goals:
Recognize the realities and myths concerning behaviours ant attitudes expected of boys in relation to seduction, romantic relationships and sexuality, and the consequences of these expectations.

Audience: 
For secondary V students

Duration: 
75 minutes
3Activity 3
Love, sex and masculinity: the challenge of being yourself

Discussion about the effects norms of masculinity have on a person’s love life.

Pedagogical goals:
Reflect of how norms of masculinity affect the behaviours and attitudes of boys in particular situations.

Audience: 
For secondary V students

Duration: 
75 minutes
Our Romeos: All they think about is sex, right ?
Issue 22 - Winter 2013 - by Annabelle Marsan
Sommaire du numéro EN
This issue covers the following topics, among others: 

- Male identity and masculinity: definitions to help us understand
- Criteria for masculinity: The Real Man’s code
- Boys are becoming men
- Is he who loves another Romeo a man?
- The male art of dating: getting close to girls but staying cool
- Do love and sex allow Romeo to become a man?
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Other issues
  • Communication in adolescent couples
  • Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
  • Counteracting the trivialization of sexual exploitation
  • Talking sexuality with your parents
  • Our Romeos: All they think about is sex, right ?
  • The bi trend: Open mindedness or trivialization?
  • FLIRTING ON LINE: Toward a safe and fulfilling exploration of self and others
  • Youth and sexism, from inequality to indifference
  • Flirting with seduction
  • Sexual fantaisies during adolescence...
Issue 25 | Spring 2016
Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
by Marie-Andrée Bossé
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