RECENT ISSUES OF THE SEXEDUCATOR

25Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
Toward improving adolescents' contraception use
Issue 25 | Spring 2016
by Marie-Andrée Bossé
Most adolescents have worries when it comes to contraception. Those concerns can vary depending on their age, sex, sexual activity, type of relationship with a sex partner, culture, information they have been given, and anticipation about their parents’ reaction and support. That adolescents have some knowledge about contraception and access to it (e.g. access to a nurse or doctor, affordable cost, quick access) is not enough for them to use a contraceptive method properly. Some personal, relational, familial and social factors should also be considered to better support adolescents’ choices, and their adoption and ongoing use of contraception.
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
24Counteracting the trivialization of sexual exploitation
Counteracting the trivialization of sexual exploitation
Issue 24 | Summer 2014
by Maude Cournoyer
Because of the various forms it takes and criminal activity that can be associated with it, sexual exploitation is complex and difficult to define. Sexual exploitation is associated with situations where one individual sexually abuses another person or uses this person for sex in exchange for goods or services. In most cases, when children or adolescents are involved in situations of sexual exploitation, power imbalances characterize the relationships between exploiters and exploited. In Québec, juvenile prostitution and procuring are forms of sexual exploitation of minors that are generally associated with street gangs. In this context, the sexual exploitation of minors is marked by absence of consent or consent that is not valid: the law does not recognize consent given by a minor in a situation of exploitation.
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
23Talking sexuality with your parents
Talking sexuality with your parents
Issue 23 | Summer 2013
by Gabrielle Lavoie
Today, with the nurse in the classroom, the science and technology teacher brought up the topic of contraception...

READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
22Our Romeos: All they think about is sex, right ?
Our Romeos: All they think about is sex, right ?
Issue 22 | Winter 2013
by Annabelle Marsan
These days, society conveys many contradictory messages about men and masculinity. Boys have to define themselves according to a flood of role models that value opposite aspects of masculinity. On the one hand, we encourage boys to be cool, confident and strong; on the other hand, we want them to be able to show that they can be vulnerable, sensitive and open. Should boys become virile heroes or prince charmings? The answer isn’t so simple. 

READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
21The bi trend: Open mindedness or trivialization?
The bi trend: Open mindedness or trivialization?
Issue 21 | Fall 2012
by Jessica Caruso
Historically, humans have been attracted to people of both sexes, but you may be wondering if this phenomenon may be some kind of trend. Indeed, young people increasingly see bisexual behaviours in the media, among their friends or in pornographic material. Therefore, we could ask ourselves the following question: Is this so-called ‘bi’ trend a celebration of diversity and sexual freedom or simply a method used by the media to attract young heterosexual consumers who have always fantasized about sex between women (Diamond, 2005)?
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
20FLIRTING ON LINE: Toward a safe and fulfilling exploration of self and others
FLIRTING ON LINE: Toward a safe and fulfilling exploration of self and others
Issue 20 | Spring 2012
by Marie-Claude Drouin
My friends really encouraged me to add a guy they met on holidays to my MSN contacts, so I did. He looks really cute in the picture; his hair is dark brown and he’s got great abs. I spoke to him a couple of times and he seems really nice. Mostly, I feel like he understands me and I can trust him. I’ve told him lots of secrets. He’s really way cool! The other day, I added a photo to my profile. I’m in my bathing suit and I’m blowing a kiss. I don’t know if HE’s seen it, but a lot of my friends have noticed it, so much that the next day at school, I was teased because of it. Some people called me “easy” and a few students even laughed at my body... I don’t know what to do anymore. A guy printed the photo and put it up on my locker. I want this to stop. Help!
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
19Youth and sexism, from inequality to indifference
Youth and sexism, from inequality to indifference
Issue 19 | Winter 2012
by Laurie Fradette
At a party at a friend’s house, Laïla, who is 14, dresses sexy in the hope that15-year-old Gabriel, with whom she is secretly in love, will notice her. During the evening, some people play a game of “Truth or Consequences”. As part of the challenge, Laïla kisses her friend Ludovic, and Gabriel does the same with another girl. Later in the evening, Laïla and Gabriel are alone together. They take the opportunity to talk and get to know each other and, after a while, they kiss.
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
18Flirting with seduction
Flirting with seduction
Issue 18 | Autumn 2011
by Julie Bourgeois
Not so long ago, I really didn’t feel like having a girlfriend. But recently, I’ve been feeling like I wanted to have one. I think I’m finally ready. I was wondering if you could give me a few seduction tips to get girls interested in me. (Kevin, 14 years old)

My problem is that at school, there’s this guy Simon. Every time I see him, I can’t stop smiling, my heart beats really fast and I blush. I’ve never talked to him and the fact that he doesn’t even know I’m alive makes me very sad. I’ve tried everything: smiling at him, walking in front of him, but it’s like I’m invisible. What can I do to have him notice me and be interested in me?
(Alexandra, 14 years old)
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
17Sexual fantaisies during adolescence...
Sexual fantaisies during adolescence...
Issue 17 | Spring 2011
by Sophie Pilon
Many people have strong emotional reactions when they hear the word fantasy, and for good reason! Not only does this word refer to a more intimate sphere of life, but many media use the concept to seduce consumers by linking it with sensational, frivolous and sometimes even wild sexuality. As a result, it can seem diffi cult, or even untimely for professionals who work with young people to tackle a topic as sensitive as this one because they may feel like they are treading on dangerous ground. This issue of The SexEducator sets out to show the importance and relevance of discussing this subject with adolescents aged 15 to 17, and to suggest concrete interventions to help you meet this goal. We invite you to take up this challenge because sexual fantasies are much more than simple sexual or obscene thoughts: they are the foundations of our sexuality and forge our identities (Crépault and Lévesque, 2001).
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES
16Communication in adolescent couples
Communication in adolescent couples
Issue 16 | Winter 2011
by Sophie Gascon
Kayla, 14, and Lucas, 15, have been together for two months. The two of them have had the impression that they could tell each other everything. For the past while, Lucas has wanted to make love with Kayla but has been unable to tell her because she’s given no indication that she shares this feeling. Since Kayla is not giving any signs, Lucas wonders if she wants him. He’s beginning to feel nervous and to have doubts: “Maybe she doesn’t love me anymore...” Then one day, he blows up: “I’m making advances toward you but you never respond! You never get close to me and you act as if you don’t even notice anything. Don’t you want to make love with me?” Kayla doesn’t understand why he’s reacting so impatiently.
READ THE WHOLE ISSUE AND LOOKAT THIS ISSUE'S ACTIVITIES

Consult the magazine archives

Other issues
  • Affective and sexual dependence - A phenomenon to discuss with youth
  • Love & Sexuality: first times
  • Sexual health: Protect it !
  • Helping young people make informed choices with regard to screening tests for sexually transmitted and blood-born infections
  • Breaking up during adolescence: helping young people cope better
  • Adolescent couples and sexual violence: subtle but devastating
  • Reassessing and reframing sexual relations ?
  • Has modesty become unfashionable ?
  • Pornography on the Internet and the consequences for youth: how do we intervene?
  • Wanting or having a child during adolescence: gaining a better understanding of what it means and of the issues involved
  • Videos games and sex roles: from cyberspace to sex education
  • Intimacy in adolescent sexual relations: The distinctive features of orogenital relations
  • When seduction amongst adolescents = power, sexual acting out and provocation
  • Embracing other cultures: Sex education for a multicultural clientele
  • Teenage pregnancy: an ongoing phenomenon
Issue 15 | Winter 2011
Love & Sexuality: first times
by Maria Del Carmen Rumoroso
What is RSS
RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication. It allows users to subscribe to one or more syndication thread using an aggregator. This system allows you to find in one place (your aggregator) any content you want, regardless of its source. Thus, you can quickly check the entire contents of your choice without having to navigate from site to site. The RSS feed is generated regularly so you can be updated in topics that interest you.
Close window X